Are You a Heart Saver? Saving Lives One Heart at a Time.

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Are You a HeartSaver? Saving Lives One Heart at a Time.

By Kris Costa


 

Let me  tell you a about a relative who had a heart attack in a mall one afternoon in December. Wisely, and frankly uncharacteristically, he made his way to the shoe department of Macy’s, which luckily was near an exit door, and complained to a cashier of pain in his chest. The ambulance arrived quickly and loaded him in. En route to the hospital, he went into cardiac arrest.

Fortunately, he was in trained hands who administered CPR and swiftly used an AED (automatic external defibrillator) to shock his heart and bring his pulse back. By the time I arrived, he was in the ER, laying in the recovery position (on his left side)—ashen and still, but alive. Alive, with the necklace he bought for his wife still clutched firmly in his hands. In the weeks to follow, as we celebrated the holiday season,
my family was acutely aware of how very close we had come to spending this time in a very different, very dreadful manner.

There is much to learn from this story. One thing for sure is to not ignore the signals that our bodies communicate to us. Another lesson is to call for medical help immediately, as the cashier did. Had one or two of those elements not been acted upon exactly as they had, this gentleman may not have been in the ambulance when he arrested. And what if he had not? Would another set of capable hands been available to save his life? Did anyone in the store know what an AED was, or where it was? I am grateful to leave that an open question in my mind. However, there is another lesson to be learned from this experience. What if someone were to go into cardiac arrest in front of YOU? Would you know what to do to save a life?

My relative was shopping alone that December afternoon, but what of the person whose family is standing witness, screaming for help to those who are unable to provide any? That sort of helplessness is a hell all its own—and it happens every day. People watch as others die. Anyone can learn CPR—and everyone should.

WHY TAKE ACTION?
• Failure to act in a cardiac emergency can lead to unnecessary deaths.
• Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival, but only 32% of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.
• Sadly, less than 8% of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.
• The American Heart Association trains more than 12 million people in CPR annually, to equip Americans with the skills they need to perform bystander CPR.

THE GOOD SAMARITAN LAW:
The Good Samaritan Law protects individuals who assist a victim during a medical emergency. Every state in the United States has a Good Samaritan Law or Act to protect individuals who offer reasonable aid during a medical emergency.Since a Good Samaritan typically does not have medical training, the law protects him or her from being liable from injury or death caused to the victim during such assistance. As long as a layperson has good intentions to aid the victim to the best of his or her ability during a medical emergency, he or she is protected under the Good Samaritan Law. Under some Good Samaritan Laws, as long as medical personnel, such as doctors, nurses, or medical responders, are following normal procedures, they too will be protected under the Good Samaritan laws. Each state law has specific guidelines.

AUTOMATIC EXTERNAL
DEFIBRILLATORS:
Automatic external defibrillators (AED) save lives. An AED is a portable device that checks the heart rhythm and if indicated, can deliver an electric shock to the heart to try to restore normal rhythm.

CPR/AED classes are taught nationwide, and many are taught for free. CPR/AED can be learned in one day, in just a few hours. Contact your local Fire Department for more information. Make sure the CPR course you inquire about also teaches AED. Many also teach child and infant CPR/AED, adult and child choking, and first aid. There is no excuse not to learn these life-saving techniques. Get going, get trained, learn how and when to use your training, and be prepared! You may never know when you may be called upon to save a life.

Kris Costa
Editor in Chief Mindset Self-Defense Magazine

KBCHeadShotEd

RESOURCES:
CPR/AED:
htp://www.redcross.org/take-a-class – (also offers pet CPR course).
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/CPRAndECC/CPR_UCM_001118_SubHomePage.jsp
Or contact your local Fire Department.
PET CPR:
http://www.pettech.net/index.php
GOOD SAMARITAN LAW BY STATE:
http://www.heartsafeam.com/pages/faq_good_samaritan

Read our article on pg. 34-35 with facts from the American Heart Association.

Safety Unplugged

Safety Unplugged
By Dan Ronin

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One of the greatest concerns parents face today is the challenge of keeping children safe in a fast moving and ever
changing world. The world we live in today is not the same as the one we grew up in. We grew up in a much smaller and slower
moving world than that of today’s youth.

When I was growing up, I played outside from morning until the streetlights came on with little-to-no adult supervision and in relative safety. The streetlights indicated dinner time, which was a cherished family gathering around the dinner table. We enjoyed our meal together and conversation of the day’s events. This was our time to connect. Television was a part of life, but not the main focus. We had a telephone on the wall, and when someone was talking on it, the rest of the family was quiet and respectful. With no cell phones, Dad was only summoned at work if the house was on fire or an equally important emergency! We learned to problem solve because we had to.

Another important factor, which was much different than today, was that we lived in the “now” reality. While actually
doing something without a cell phone or computer at hand, we were forced to focus on our activity. Creativity flourished,
delayed gratification was a developed by the natural wait for things, and it was not so easy to be distracted from any negative consequence of actions that may not have been in our best interest! Today we do not live in the now, we live in the “screen,” and such fixation can be a sure impediment to learning necessary life lessons. Often, children make choices not by a set of family values but by what others are doing. They are all too quickly aware of and informed in the advent of this “selfie” society, where good examples are hard to come by and even harder to filter. If we want our children to grow up and live in a safe world, we need to teach them to make good choices. When it comes to self-defense, children and young people are often at a disadvantage. They are smaller, weaker and more easily influenced than most adults. However, this is also the precise time period when the most important form of self-defense self awareness, can be developed. This is when the mindset can be formed and if we teach good safety habits when our children are at a young age we have a head start!

Train your children to be aware. Awareness is lacking more now than at anytime in the past. Most situations can be avoided by simply being aware of the world around you. Teach your children that they need to pay attention to what is happening in their environment. They won’t learn this on TV. Let your children make their own decisions, guided, of course, by your sound judgment. By allowing your child to seemingly make their own age- appropriate decisions as soon and as often
as possible, they build their insight, ability and confidence in making sound choices. When children are allowed to make their own decisions, they learn by their own successes and mistakes which path of judgment is best. When we learn, we grow our minds, and our ability to problem solve increases. The more problems solved on their own the better, and the better equipped they will be in life.

Additionally, if children are respected for their good decisions, they will treat others with respect as well as be able to
recognize “disrespect.” This is an important factor in developing healthy personal boundaries. This will translate to a day to day skill set, making the on screen challenges seem more like the fiction it is. Your child will be able to recognize real warning signs in the real world, and will be able to avoid tangible potential problems unlike the drama scenarios they see on TV. Remember, the key here is age- appropriate decisions with your guidance.

Remember to connect with your children on a daily basis. Find a ritual and stick to it. Dinner can be difficult with kids
on the go, but it is very important to do your best to make that work. On the nights where it does not, have a plan B for connecting. Don’t let a day go by.

In a world where people are endlessly challenged to make safety decisions, make sure your children learn well how to interpret information and do what they think is best. Hopefully, they will grow to be the person who can teach their children the same!
Read this article on our E- Magazine

-Dan Ronin
RoninDan
Dan Ronin has trained in the martial arts for over 30 years. He is a combat veteran who served as a Military Police Investigator in the Army for 8 1/2 years. Dan offers classes in Counter-Attack self defense for open hands and weaponry, as well as disaster/emergency preparedness. Contact Dan at dan@roninproducts.com or 602-373-9630

“If-Then” Self-Defense

if-thenI am always interested in the studies of crime statistics, probabilities and scenarios. Certainly these studies yield important information and can act as prediction indicators of the occurrence of crime but the information they gather, simply put, are generalities. IF such and such is in place, THEN we may assume that x,y,z will follow. Basically, when it comes to crime indicators, I think the if-then scenario concludes the following predictability reliability: Sometimes. When it comes to predicting whether or not a certain person will commit a violent crime one must consider the individual with their ever changing experiences, chemistry and soul status. I am sure that even the most organic of us cannot predict with any certainty what another will do from one moment to the next.

No one is immune from crime. If we were, we wouldn’t need all those statistics, probabilities and studies to predict its occurrence in the first place. Life itself is an “if-then” scenario. If we are in the path of any number of scenarios that manifest into a violent crime, then we must know what to do. Danger is always brewing somewhere.

In terms of safety, we simply are safe until we are not. Sounds simple but it is true. Here’s another if-then scenario to think about. If you learn nothing, then you will know nothing. Although our basic instinct may be to survive in the face of danger, that often is not enough to actually survive. It is not enough to want to survive if you don’t know how.

Logically speaking, there are just too many threatening scenarios to think about preparing for. At the end of the day, we live with so many risks all around us that it just doesn’t make sense to consider them all and wonder which one we will most probably have to deal with. We rely on studies and statistics, to make educated choices about our safety based on our best guess of where we fit into those statistics and that is helpful, however, crime doesn’t always make sense therefore statistics can not be 100% accurate and only so much of our society can be patrolled at once.

Simply put you will never really know what is coming your way until it is happening.

The only thing we can really rely on is ourselves. The best defense to the myriad of risks that ebb and flow around each of our interactions in life is to know where we stand within them. By it’s very nature, violence is not a predictable event. If it were, no one would become a victim, and clearly, there are victims of violent crime every day all day long.

What safety really becomes is another if-then scenario. Simply put, if I am attacked, then I need to know what to do to survive. If I know what to do then it doesn’t really matter if I am attacked. I know how to defend myself so I will.  That skill will help me get out of trouble. It is the same way that I approach renting a car at the airport. If I know how to drive, then it really doesn’t matter what make or model they hand me the keys to.  If I know how to drive, then I will and increase my chances or arriving safely because I have the basic skill. You cannot always predict which threat in life you will have to deal with, but if you know how to protect yourself, then your chances of survival increase no matter what situation you find yourself in. But only if you have the skills.

We are not born with appropriate self-defends strategies because the nature of threats against us change with the climate of the era. However, it is essential that we do learn to protect ourselves because we never know which situation we will be handed. Without skills, we live a life of chance of which threat we may actually encounter, and common sense tells us that it is not a matter of If, but a matter of when.

~KBC

Mindset Self-Defenese offers workshops, products and a cutting edge magazine dedicated to the self-defense, personal protection and safety of women. Learn more at http://www.mindsetselfdefense.com

 

Know your Rights- The Law and Abusive Relationships

Law

Arguably the most important part of life is to be in relationships with other people. A good relationship, whether with a family member, friend or spouse/significant other, is a great blessing.
However, human interaction is complicated, and sadly, some relationships turn sour and can become outright harmful. Abuse can be physical and/or psychological and can cause enormous harm to the person on the receiving end. What, if any, remedies does the law offer a victim of domestic abuse?

The tool most readily available is an Order of Protection, (also called a Restraining Order, an Injunction Against Harassment, etc.). Such an order, properly issued and served, prohibits the
perpetrator from having any contact with the victim(s) and can even prohibit the person from going near the victim’s home or work. One can be obtained by applying in person at the court nearest you. If contact occurs, the perpetrator can be charged with a crime, and if caught, they will be arrested even if the contact is nonthreatening or non-violent. A person convicted of violating a protection order will likely be ordered to complete a violence intervention program and could be sentenced to jail time.

When should you get an Order of Protection?
For instance, if your ex is messaging you 400 times a day about getting back together, and you have asked that they stop but it continues, you may want to consider getting a protective order.
Even if none of the messages contain any threats of injury, this can be harassing and stressful. Of course, if threats are uttered or physical violence is perpetrated, a crime has been
committed, which deserves police attention in addition to providing a reason for a protective order.

Once the order is signed by the judge, the person against whom it is issued (the Defendant) has a right to respond. Upon being served, the Defendant can request a hearing and contest the
allegations. Here in Arizona, any incident alleged must have occurred within the previous 12 months. If the incident occurred outside of the previous year, the order will be dismissed. An order is in effect for one year unless renewed for good cause, and they can be dropped early upon the request of the protected party.

If the relationship between the two parties is that of spouse, lover, significant other or parent of a joint child etc, the defendant is prohibited from possessing firearms during the duration of the order. If the defendant is caught possessing a firearm during while subject to an order, felony charges can be brought for “Prohibited Possessor of a Firearm.”

Due to being a cynic and apt to state the obvious, A protective order does not protect anyone from a person who ignores it. Earl; the man of song lyric notoriety “who walked right thru the restraining order,” comes to mind (The Dixie Chicks), but it is a tool that ups the ante on a perpetrator after the fact.

Always use common sense; in imminently dangerous situations call the Police!!! If the situation is ongoing, seek help from family and friends, religious or other non-profit organizations that focus on helping victims of abuse. In addition, many prosecutors’ offices have Victim Advocate Groups that assists crime victims during the perpetrator’s court process. Although not a legal system remedy; do not overlook martial arts training both armed and un-armed for the most extreme situations; the skills learned can be beneficial outside the realm of abusive relationships.

Notes of caution. There are two disturbing phenomenon surrounding protective orders. First, there are victims of SERIOUS PHYSICAL ABUSE who do not even report the incident to the police, much less have a protective order in effect! For your own sake and for the sake of those who love you, please do not find yourself in this category.

On the other hand, sometimes alleged perpetrators are framed by a person hiding behind a protective order and concocting accusations out of spite. For the sake of others, avoid belonging to
this category.On a positive note, many defendants report that they have greatly benefitted from the violence intervention classes they took after violating a court order. They have gone on to happier, more peaceful lives and healthier relationships.
-ME
ErikssonMagnus
Magnus Eriksson is a Criminal Defense Trial Attorney based in Scottsdale and is currently licensed to practice in the Sate and Federal Courts of Arizona. contact Magnus at: magnuse@cox.net

2014 MASK Unity Luncheon

The Table settings at the Unity Luncheon.
The Table settings at the Unity Luncheon.

We had the great honor of attending the 2014 MASK Unity Luncheon “Moms Making a Difference” yesterday, March 20, 2014. MASK is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating both parents and children about the issues facing our youth and to empower children to make safe, healthy choices. We are very excited to be a part of MASK Unity Community and to help further both our missions for the community by bringing self-defense, bullying workshops, and more to the MASK community and most importantly to the youth of our community. The Luncheon proved that by working together, bringing all our skills/expertise to the table, spreading awareness, and providing resources to help educate our youth, we can truly make a difference in our community. Look for our logo and events up on the MASK Unity Community page at http://www.maskmatters.org.

MASK publisher Kimberly Cabral's daughter (and future power house/visionary) introduces her mom at the Luncheon
MASK publisher Kimberly Cabral’s daughter (and future power house/visionary) introduces her mom at the Luncheon

MASK Publishe Kimberly Cabral speaks at the Unity Luncheon at The Fairmont Princess
MASK Publisher Kimberly Cabral speaks at the Unity Luncheon at The Fairmont Princess

I Challenge You!

…to get the stats!

If you picked up a newspaper, (ok, I am over 30) errr, or googled the news, or better yet, contacted your local police department, you probably would be shocked to see the amount of crime that is going on in your neighborhoods.  My office is in Scottsdale, AZ., so that’s what I checked. I simply entered “scottsdale violent crime statistics” in the search field and here is what I found:

2010 Crime Rate Indexes Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Arizona United States
Total Crime Risk 63 143 100
Murder Risk 58 144 100
Rape Risk 32 98 100
Robbery Risk 29 102 100
Assault Risk 33 112 100
Burglary Risk 66 139 100
Larceny Risk 48 127 100
Motor Vehicle Theft Risk 96 220 100

The data for Scottsdale, AZ 85260 may also contain data for the following areas: Scottsdale

“Crime Risk Index (100 = National Average): Index score for an area is compared to the national average of 100. A score of 200 indicates twice the national average total crime risk, while 50 indicates half the national risk. We encourage you to consult with a knowledgeable local real estate agent or contact the local police department for any additional information. Crime Indexes are based on numerous current and historical datasets as well as proprietary modeling algorithms which estimate values at more granular geographic levels when specific data is either unavailable or impractical to aggregate. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, these are estimates and should only be used as a guide. For detailed information regarding crime and safety in a community, please contact local law enforcement agencies.”

Hmmm, although I am glad that Scottsdale falls under the national average in some crimes  (which we all know is too much to begin with) I wasn’t exactly pleased with the murder risk value. Burglary and rape didn’t exactly relax me either, nor did an overall crime risk of 63 which inched up toward the national average, and this is “Scottsdale”. Look at the rest of Arizona. Not too pretty at all.

Having moved here from NYC, I was wondering what was going on in that neck of the woods.  So I picked an affluent part of town located by Lincoln Center and the Julliard School to search next. Here is what I found there, and the comparison to Scottsdale.

2010 Crime Rate Indexes Scottsdale, AZ 85260 New York, NY 10023 United States
Total Crime Risk 63 133 100
Murder Risk 58 116 100
Rape Risk 32 80 100
Robbery Risk 29 432 100
Assault Risk 33 144 100
Burglary Risk 66 57 100
Larceny Risk 48 81 100
Motor Vehicle Theft Risk 96 111 100

If you live in Scottsdale, you may at first glance, think whew! (If you live in NYC this doesn’t surprise you, unless of course you live by Lincoln Center). However, Scottsdale, ask yourself two questions:

  1. Am I comfortable with the levels of crime that does exist in Scottsdale? Let’s face it, its not zero. And..
  2. Do I travel outside of Scottsdale, or do I live in a bubble?

I bet you’ve been to Tempe, a big college town as you probably know:

2010 Crime Rate Indexes Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Tempe, AZ United States
Total Crime Risk 63 162 100
Murder Risk 58 75 100
Rape Risk 32 117 100
Robbery Risk 29 115 100
Assault Risk 33 94 100
Burglary Risk 66 119 100
Larceny Risk 48 213 100
Motor Vehicle Theft Risk 96 288 100

OMG! Look at those numbers!  I am not saying this to scare you into taking care of your own personal safety and protection. I am saying it because it is happening. By the statistics in Scottsdale, 68% of you will not have a rape go to completion, however, 32% will! If you are in Tempe, the rape statistic goes up to 117, which is higher than NYC! Think again, where would you send your kids to school and what do we need to be teaching our girls??????

I want every woman to understand that learning to protect yourself is simply a VERY GOOD THING to know.

Stay safe out there, it’s Friday night. And we all know what alcohol and partying does to people’s judgment.

~KBC

 

Erin Go Bragh

Kiss-Me-Im-Irish

As green day approaches, lets take a moment to talk about awareness and safety!

  1. Pack light! Whether doing the pub crawl or visiting a house party, bring only your drivers license (or a designated driver!), a few bucks in your pocket and your cell phone.
  2. Beware of pick pockets and other hoodlums if attending a parade (situational awareness is the key here).
  3. If you are the designated driver (DD) be aware of those that are swaying around you, either in a vehicle or on foot!
  4. Consider public transportation.
  5. Avoid being alone, use the buddy system.
  6. Don’t drink on an empty stomach, eat and drink lots of water before and during the festivities
  7. Don’t EVER leave a drink unattended!
  8. Find the phone number of a reputable taxi company before you go out, just in case.

These are just a few pointers.

Have a great time and stay safe out there!!

Tough Decisions

“The liquid burns your innocent throat as it slowly makes its way from the bottle to the inside of your sober mouth. The first swig is tough, the second also does not come with ease, but with each swig the sting decreases along with your judgment. Your vision becomes blurry, your stride is not so steady and your mind is far from clear. You look around yourself and notice that most of your friends are in the same state as you are, if not worse. The party has died down and most of your fellow partiers are now coupled away in the bedroom or heaping heavily over a guest room toilet. You have come to the conclusion that everyone has had enough to drink, or maybe even a little too much.

roadview

Your thoughts, as you applied your make up prior to the party, was to simply have a good time and come home safely. Your thoughts now, inebriated and short of judgment, are scattered so far across your brain that even you can’t tell what they are. The only thing you are thinking of currently is getting home. As the thought of your comfortable bed dances through your brain, your car keys begin to tease you from inside your purse. They invite you to insert them in the car ignition and press your right foot to the gas; bring everyone to their beds. You know that this is a bad idea, although at the time it seems to be the easiest, but when is the easiest decision ever the best? No one wants to wait for a cab, no one wants to pay for a cab and conclusively, none of your friends want to even take cab. You are the most clear headed out of all your friends, although you really are not clear headed at all. It seems a unanimous vote has taken place, and the winner is you, you need to drive everyone home. Hey, you’re only a few blocks from home anyway, right?

You elude the thoughts in your head that encourage you to call home and tell your parents that you need to be picked up. You are scared of the consequences that they may implement if they were to find out you are stranded and drunk at a party. What you are not clearly thinking about enough, however, is the consequences that you may face if you drive while drunk. At first the idea of driving everyone home seems completely ridiculous, you have had way too much to drink and driving your car is just completely out of the question. You decide to call a cab and are put on hold for quite some time, how annoying this all seems to be. As the line holds, the idea of drunk driving rapidly becomes more and more appealing to you. Your stomach is hurting, your head is pounding and all you want to do is collapse onto your bed in the comfort of your own home. Your brain suggests that you call your parents, they always said to call them in an emergency,  but is this really an emergency? Calling your parents is just out of the question entirely; partying, drinking, and boys were not on the agenda you told your dad earlier this evening. Your friends are becoming ill beside you as your phone is still on hold; you become increasingly anxious and unsure of what to do. You begin to regret the drinking that you embarked on earlier and realize that this night was not thought through enough. You are frustrated and annoyed; before you even realize it, you’re on the highway, foot on the pedal and hazy eyes on the road in front of you….”

Everyone, at one point in their lives or another, adults included, think to themselves that nothing can happen to them. One commonality of the human condition, is that at times we believe that we are invincible. Most human beings prefer to be in control of things. For example, many people are afraid of flying. This would seem to be due to the fact that you are suspended in a large object and flying above solid ground, tens of thousands of feet in the air. For some, this is the reason that people are afraid of flying; but for the vast majority, what people are really scared of, is the lack of control over their lives. Many individuals would be completely comfortable flying thousands of feet above solid ground, if they were the ones in the cockpit. This relates to drunk driving in the sense that many people, especially teenagers, falsely believe that while being drunk they still have enough control to operate a moving vehicle. Warning to everyone who has a pulse on this planet; you are not “Superman” and you cannot drive anything while drunk!

Young adults are faced with tough decisions every day. They need support to make these decisions because it is not always easy to make healthy choices and it is especially difficult when you are young. We young people need the support and knowledge of those who have lived longer. Our parent’s mistakes not only to help them grow, but to help us grow. Teenagers should not be afraid to talk to their parents!!! I believe that I can speak for all parents, when I say that if you are drunk and at a party, call for help no matter how “grounded” you think you could be; whether it is a parent, a grandparent or even an older sibling, just call. Every twenty-two minutes a person is killed in an alcohol-related motor vehicle accident! (FirstEagle.com). If there is one thing that I have learned, as cheesy as it may sound, it is that your parents are your number one friends; they will have your back whenever you need it, they will pick you up when you are down lower then you ever thought possible and they will love you through even the worst of mistakes. The one thing your parents cannot do, is help you grow if you are dead. Drunk driving will not only kill you, but it can kill any other person on the road or in the car with you.

“You are driving steadily, for what it seems like a couple minutes. Your friends are loudly laughing in the backseat and you are having a hard time focusing. Your head is throbbing uncontrollably and you are beginning to swerve on the icy roads that lead to your house. As you turn around to tell your friends to be quiet, you feel an outrageous spark of pain and suddenly, everything becomes blank. The next time you open your eyes, you’re staring at a broken and blood spattered windshield. You painfully turn around, feeling each of your ribs grind against each other with extreme discomfort. It is at this moment that you begin to weep at the sight of your permanently silenced friends in the backseat of your now crumbled car”.

-ARC